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Arnold Whitman Honored at Alzheimer’s Association Brain Ball

Arnold Whitman, Aging2.0 Partner, is being honored at the Alzheimer’s Association Brain Ball this year. With your help, we want to help him raise funds for the cause. It is his determination and vision that guides all of Aging2.0’s work towards improving the lives of older people around the world. To achieve Arnie’s goal is to provide hope for the one in three seniors living with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. We believe that we can make a difference. We hope you will join us.  
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Gingrich reckons Alzheimer's could cost $20 trillion.

Now, 1 trillion already sounds high, but 20 trillion - really? That's more than the annual GDP of the US. Throwing big numbers around just goes to show there needs to be some more analytical rigor applied to the debate. Until then, these amounts won't stick. NIHs Collins told a Senate appropriations subcommittee that theres a "very frightening cost curve." In 2050, when more than 13 million Americans are projected to have Alzheimers, the bill is expected to reach a staggering $1 trillion. But he said that cost could be halved merely by finding a way to delay people getting Alzheimers by five years.Monday, Republican presidential contender Newt Gingrich jumped into the debate, saying that over the next four decades Alzheimers could cost the government a total of $20 trillion. He suggested selling U.S. bonds to raise money for research rather than have the disease compete each year for a share of the federal budget.
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Early Stages Of Alzheimer's Now Get Formal Definitions

The new definitions, which were just published online by the journal Alzheimer's  Dementia, acknowledge this dimly understood early phase of Alzheimer's. Now there are two new pre-dementia phases: mild cognitive impairment and "preclinical Alzheimer's."
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Alzheimer's only major disease that's getting worse, not better

I'm doing some research into dementia, and it's fascinating how Alzheimer's is the sleeping giant - that is really waking up. From the National Center for Health Statistics, we see that Alzheimer's is the sixth-leading cause of death in the country and the only cause of death among the top 10 in the United States that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. Based on mortality data from 2000-2008, death rates have declined for most major diseases – heart disease (-13 percent), breast cancer (-3 percent), prostate cancer (-8 percent), stroke (-20 percent) and HIV/AIDS (-29) − while deaths from Alzheimer's disease have risen 66 percent during the same period.
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